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Autism Spectrum Disorder Treatment

Alternative Therapies for Autism Spectrum Disorder Treatment

In an effort to do everything possible to help their children, many parents continually seek new treatments. Some treatments are developed by reputable therapists or by parents of a child with autism spectrum disorder. Although an unproven treatment may help one child, it may not prove beneficial to another. To be accepted as a proven treatment, the treatment should undergo clinical trials (preferably randomized, double-blind trials) that would allow for a comparison between treatment and no treatment. Following are some of the interventions that have been reported to have been helpful to some children, but whose efficacy or safety has not been proven.
 
Dietary Interventions
Dietary interventions are based on the ideas that:
 
If parents decide to try a special diet for a given period of time, they should be sure that the child's nutritional status is measured carefully.
 
A diet that some parents have found helpful to their autistic child is a gluten-free, casein-free diet. Gluten is a casein-like substance that is found in the seeds of various cereal plants -- wheat, oat, rye, and barley. Casein is the principal protein in milk. Since gluten and milk are found in many of the foods we eat, following a gluten-free, casein-free diet is difficult.
 
A supplement that some parents feel is beneficial for an autistic child is vitamin B6, taken with magnesium (which makes the vitamin effective). The result of research studies is mixed; some children respond positively, some negatively, some not at all or very little.
 
Secretin
In the search for autism treatment, there has been discussion in the last few years about the use of secretin, a substance approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for a single dose normally given to aid in diagnosis of a gastrointestinal problem. Anecdotal reports have shown improvement in autism symptoms, including sleep patterns, eye contact, language skills, and alertness. Several clinical trials conducted in the last few years have found no significant improvements in symptoms between patients who received secretin and those who received a placebo.
 
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Explain Autism Spectrum Disorders

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